Potomac River

Ugly Vibrating Jigs Need Love, Too

Ugly Vibrating Jigs Need Love, Too

I’ve had the same vibrating jig on the deck of my boat since about the end of May. I may have retied once or twice, and I’ve gone through a handful of trailers, but other than that it’s the exact same bait. It’s caught quite a few bass, more snakeheads than I can recall, a couple of perch and two overaggressive blue catfish. I’ve certainly gotten my five buck investment back in multiples, and it’s probably due to be retired, but I just can’t bring myself to do it. I have more confidence in this one lure than any other of its type that I’ve ever owned.

Snakebit

Snakebit

I’ve spent a lot of my time on the water over the last month helping out-of-town friends chase snakeheads, so when I had a free day to fish on Friday I was determined to chase bass only. Nevermind the fact that the mercury was expected to tickle the hundred degree mark, without a lick of wind, I was going all in on Micropterus – at least until I ran out of Gatorade and water.

Yak Attack

Yak Attack

I am now four days deep into my snakeheading “guide” career, as friends from out of town have sought me out to help them fill their snakey jones on the Potomac. In fact, I have my first repeat visitor coming from Texas (via ICAST) on Friday night for a chance to repeat last year’s ultimately victorious struggle over the prehistoric invasives.

A Natural Gas Disaster

A Natural Gas Disaster

The last gas station that you pass on the way to Leesylvania State Park, the Potomac River boat ramp that I use most often, is called Wawa. I stop there probably 90% of the times that I fish the river, either to get gas (lowest price in the area), ice, one of their excellent sandwiches, or sometimes all three.

Pretty Much a Reset

Pretty Much a Reset

When the Bassmaster Tour visited the Potomac River 30 years ago, everyone knew that Jay Yelas was likely going to spend some time on an abandoned wharf called Fox’s Ferry. Why wouldn’t he? It contributed to a win in 1993 along with several other top five and top ten finishes. I’m sure that other anglers fished it during practice and competition, but on some level everyone knew it as “Jay’s spot.”

Wind Blows

Wind Blows

When I leave my house to head out to fish the Potomac River, I make a right turn out of the driveway, a left turn at the first intersection, and about a quarter mile down the road there is a flagpole with a massive American flag. That’s my first sign of how the day will go. If it’s standing perpendicular to the pole, straightened by a brisk wind, I know that I am about to get my 48-year-old back pounded into submission.

An Eastern Guide to Snakes

An Eastern Guide to Snakes

I have a friend from Texas coming here Friday night with the goal of catching a Potomac River snakehead. He’s someone who has helped me tremendously since the earliest stages of my outdoor writing career, when he was the pro-staff manager of a major rod company, and I was some guy just struggling to get published.

Peter Piper Picked a Peck

Peter Piper Picked a Peck

In 25 years of riding around in bass boats, I’ve seen all sorts of meals brought on board. Of course, there have been thousands of packs of Nabs and hundreds of cans of properly-aged Vienna Sausages. There’s been at least three Herefords worth of beef jerky and a gross of Pop Tarts. I’ve seen a partner eat Chinese food (with a spork) out of one of those little folding takeout containers, and I’ve witnessed another place a half rack of ribs on his butt seat for easy access.