Mexico

Mexico Advice -- Rein in the Lure Wanderlust

Mexico Advice -- Rein in the Lure Wanderlust

I’d guesstimate that I have 80 pounds of tackle in the two bags I keep in storage at Lake El Salto. Most of it consists of proven tools, but there are also plenty of items that haven’t produced a single fish for me down there – including flutter spoons, umbrella rigs and various glide baits. Their lack of production might be because I don’t know what the hell I’m doing, or because I’ve fished them at the wrong times, or a combination of the two, but the bottom line is that they’re wasting space, and so far they’ve wasted time, too.

Sam I Am

Sam I Am

One of the reasons Hanna and I go back to Anglers Inn again and again and again is because after a dozen or so trips the staff has started to feel like family. Actually, better than family – because none of my close relatives has ever unhooked a fish for me, tied a knot for me, or jumped up from the seated position to carry my overstuffed tackle bag from my boat to my room.

Hold the Phone

Hold the Phone

Anyone who’s known me for a long time knows that I am not a particularly adept or enthusiastic telephone conversationalist. In spite of that fact, I have two jobs that require me to spend multiple hours on the phone each day – first, discussing my clients’ legal issues, and second, talking to anglers from all over the world about tournament results, fisheries and techniques.

My, What Big Teeth You Have

My, What Big Teeth You Have

At Anglers Inn El Salto, the guides fully expect to land every one of the many fish you’ll catch. I don’t really roll like that, so my general rule is to land all fish caught on single-hooked lures myself, unless they are net-worthy, and to leave the vast majority of fish caught on treble hooked lures to them.