A One Man Welcoming Committee

The first time I saw a Scrounger head was while riding with Aaron Martens on Day One of the 2004 Bassmaster Classic on Lake Wylie. At that time, I figured it was just a tool for his distinctive mind, one that he’d continue to use furtively and under very limited circumstances. I didn’t think that it would become a major part of my fishing arsenal, both in clear water finesse situations, as well as in the trophy waters of Mexico, and I probably haven't even scratched the surface of what they can do.

As I wait for my backordered 1 and 1 ¼ ounce versions from Hog Farmer to arrive in anticipation of my next trip to El Salto, I can’t help but wonder if this is the one category of lure that would not exist today but for a pro angler’s devotion to it. Had AMart not resuscitated the scrounger-style head, I don’t think they’d be available today. Is there any other type of lure about which you could say that? Had Paul Elias not won at Guntersville, we nevertheless would’ve found out about the Alabama Rig. Had Phil Marks not dominated at Rayburn, the 10XD was still going to come to market.

The other example that jumps out of my mind is Gary Yamamoto and the Senko. Of course it would not exist without him. Yes, he popularized it on the water, but I think there’s a distinction between the two. Gary is an inventor and tinkerer, so you could say the same about the inventor of the buzzbait or the chatterbait or the A-Rig. Martens literally took a lure that had been consigned to the dust bin of history and made it its own category on tackle store shelves. Am I missing any other such examples?

Photo courtesy of B.A.S.S.

Photo courtesy of B.A.S.S.