Them Belly Full

Them Belly Full

The one problem with the overwhelming catch and release ethic in bass fishing is that we don’t always know exactly what the fish we catch have been eating. Of course we occasionally find a shad tail sticking out of the throat of a freshly-caught largemouth, and many of us have found crawfish or small, partially-digested bluegills in our livewells, but even when one forage is dominant, it’s not always what they’re chewing on.

Silly Season Updates (Not Really)

Silly Season Updates (Not Really)

Autumn is usually a slow time for news in the bass fishing world, but this year is an aberration. Those of us who care about these things have been provided an embarrassingly rich news feed as the sport has undergone what appears likely to be a massive change.

(Not) At Your Service

(Not) At Your Service

In 2001, just after OMC (then-manufacturer of Johnson and Evinrude outboards) went belly-up, I was scheduled to spend a tournament practice day with Missouri pro Chad Brauer. As we trolling-motored away from the Jolly Roger Marina on the upper end of stumpy Toledo Bend, his father Denny yelled out, “Try not to break anything.”

A Reverse Bucket List

A Reverse Bucket List

Over the past dozen years my writing has opened doors that enabled me to experience all sorts of incredible fishing trips. I’ve fished for peacock bass in the Amazon (twice, with a third trip on the schedule), tigerfish on Africa’s Lower Zambezi River, redfish in Venice and cutthroat trout in Montana. I’ve spent three days practicing with KVD on the California Delta and multiple days on St. Clair with a two-time PMTT Champion. I’ve taken off my shoes to fish in AMart’s boat on a private lake in Georgia, and I was there to see Rick Clunn’s most recent victory at the St. Johns. Last year I made a trip to East Texas where I got to fish with four different Classic qualifiers (Keith Combs, Clark Reehm, Albert Collins and Lonnie Stanley) on three exceptional lakes – when two great days on Rayburn are the least productive days of the five, you can call it a trip of a lifetime.

Even Allen Iverson was Shocked

Even Allen Iverson was Shocked

Basszone.com published a great story on Wednesday about Steve Kennedy’s U.S. Open effort. On a per-mile-driven basis, the Alabama pro did not make out particularly well in Vegas, but if you judge based on per-hour-practiced, he likely lapped the field.

The Times We Live In: Ten Thoughts

The Times We Live In: Ten Thoughts

Last Thursday, the New York Times published a lengthy (approximately 3,000 words) feature on the state of bass fishing titled “This Is the Most Lucrative Moment in History to Catch Bass.” The writer, Haley Cohen Gilliland, previously of mega-serious and prestigious publications like The Economist and Vanity Fair, did a fantastic job with what is likely a difficult topic for people outside of our orbit to understand.

Brushes with Balsa

Brushes with Balsa

On Monday I quizzed 2015 Forrest Wood Cup winner Brad Knight for the better part of two hours about how he compiles his arsenal of Lew’s Custom Speed Sticks, but we had 15 minutes left before we each had to move onto other projects, so I started digging around in his boat.

Flash Me!

Flash Me!

On Monday I got to spend 90 minutes in the boat with David Fritts, 1993 Bassmaster Classic Champion, 1997 FLW Championship victor, and widely acknowledged crankbait savant. About a decade ago I’d spent a day with him on the Potomac River on a tour practice day, but that day he was focused on finding fish so I really couldn’t pick his brain. This time, it was all about the Q&A.

Tommy Boy, Hall of Fame Edition

Tommy Boy, Hall of Fame Edition

Before last week’s Bass Fishing Hall of Fame induction ceremony fades too far into the rearview mirror, I wanted to offer one last thought about the inductees. While nonagenarian Berkley Bedell wowed me, Gary Klein and KVD were shoo-ins, and Helen Sevier could probably buy them all (James Henshall, who died 93 years ago, slightly before Bedell caught his first fish, was not in attendance), it would be irresponsible not to give broadcaster Tommy Sanders some love in print.