Hula Grubs

Au After Dark

Au After Dark

In central Arizona where Yamamoto Pro Tai Au lives, daytime temperatures in the summer regularly soar into the low teens and occasionally foray into the low 120’s. By mid-morning water temperatures climb above 80 degrees. Of course it’s possible to catch bass under these conditions, but in addition to the sweltering heat during the day, you have to deal with hordes of pleasure boaters, water skiers, and jet skis. The solution is to fish at night. The bonus is that nighttime is a great time to catch a really big fish.

Spring Jig Fishing

Spring Jig Fishing

Right now we are being blessed with an abundance, even an over-abundance, of water out west. In Arizona, most of our central lakes are filled to the brim, and some are even going over the spillways. Our hope is that the powers that be will let the water stay up for the spawn. Meanwhile, fishing can be tough – all that inflow has muddied up the lakes, and most of the incoming water is cold. The spawn is still a ways off, but some fish are already starting to move up. This means that the best thing to use is something that you can fish fast or slow, shallow or deep; in other words, a jig.

Hula in the Dark

Hula in the Dark

In my part of the southwest, summer days are just about unbearable out on the water. The sun beats down mercilessly, with temperatures going well above 110 on most days. Add to that hordes of tipsy water skiers and jet skiers and you have a recipe for a lousy day on the lake. That’s why most tournaments out here during the summer are night tournaments. It’s still hot, but at least the sun isn’t pounding you and crisping your skin. Even better, the night bite can be awesome - especially when the moon is out - and nothing gets bigger bites at night in my neck of the woods than a chubby little Hula Grub on a football head jig.

Targeting Offshore Bass with Hula Jigs and Skirts

Targeting Offshore Bass with Hula Jigs and Skirts

I love catching bass in deep water – well, OK - really anywhere; however, there is something especially rewarding about finding bass on deep water structure.  I guess it’s the fact that these deep water techniques require a little extra map study and a willingness to spend a lot of time idling with the electronics pinging until you find that likely looking area.