Small Swimbaits Yield Big Results For Jay Yelas

Small Swimbaits Yield Big Results For Jay Yelas

A former Bassmaster Classic champion and veteran FLW Tour pro, Jay Yelas is no stranger to big bass. However, the Oregon angler knows that nabbing big bass often means throwing smaller baits. In his view, small swimbaits exemplify this premise.

“Especially on public lakes that get a lot of fishing pressure, most all of the fish have been caught before and you’re trying to recapture the same fish,” he said. “So, having a small, natural profile in your bait makes a big difference, because these are educated fish.

The Zako: The Perfect Vibrating Jig Trailer Comes to Fruition

The Zako: The Perfect Vibrating Jig Trailer Comes to Fruition

Whether you call it a Chatterbait, a vibrating jig, or a bladed jig, there is no denying that pro angler Brett Hite of Phoenix, Arizona has had a lot of success on the unique lure which features a metal blade in front of a rubber-skirted jig. 

Hite has a BASS Elite Series win (Lake Seminole) and two FLW Tour wins (Toho and Okeechobee) to his credit thanks to a vibrating a jig. Over the years he has perfected every facet of his vibrating jig system except one: the trailer. 

Introducing the New Yamamoto Sanshouo Salamander

Introducing the New Yamamoto Sanshouo Salamander

If you ever get the opportunity to talk fishing with Bub Tosh, it won't take you long to discover his passion for all aspects of the sport. There are many facets to his fishing career; Touring Professional and Bait Company Owner just to name a few. Today he enjoys the challenge of conceptualizing and designing baits. Over the past few years he has designed the PscyhoDad and the California Roll for Gary Yamamoto Custom Baits. Tosh is very excited about his latest creation, the Sanshouo (pronounced san-show-oh).

Transitioning from Weekend Warrior to Tour-Level Pro

Transitioning from Weekend Warrior to Tour-Level Pro

It’s been said the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. For years I have approached tournament fishing utilizing that very game-plan, and to some extent I have been successful. I have a couple of team and a BFL angler of the year crowns, but the events I’ve fished have been one or two day events, usually on lakes and rivers that I have significant experience on.

Drop-Shotting in the Fall

Drop-Shotting in the Fall

As far as I’m concerned, fall is the very best time year to fish. The weather is gorgeous and if there is a bit of a nip in the air all it does is discourage pleasure boaters and water skiers. Life is good. The water temperatures are cooling down as well, so that means that the fish are on the move and you can get on a really good bite. Often there is a crankbait or spinnerbait bite, and topwater is always worth a try, especially first thing in the morning. But sometimes a reaction bait just doesn’t do the trick. When that happens, a drop shot can save the day.

Jay Yelas Drop Shotting the Shad Shape Worm for Smallmouth

Jay Yelas Drop Shotting the Shad Shape Worm for Smallmouth

Over the years, the Yamamoto Shad Shape Worm has developed a reputation for being an outstanding bait for catching smallmouth bass.  While the Shad Shape Worm is an extremely effective offering for both largemouths and spotted bass, it is a must-have weapon in the arsenal of serious brown bass hunters.  FLW Touring Pro and Yamamoto National Team Member, Jay Yelas agrees.  “The Shad Shape Worm is my favorite for smallmouths and it’s a go-to drop shot bait for me.”

Social Media - Friend or Foe?

Social Media - Friend or Foe?

I’ll be the first to admit, I was a little slow to get on-board with the social media craze but two things pushed me over the hump.  First and foremost, the Inside Line magazine went digital and second, lots and lots of peer pressure.  While I may be slow to adapt, I am also a very cautious individual and I monitored a lot of good and bad material before I decided to dip my own personal toes into the drink.

Hula in the Dark

Hula in the Dark

In my part of the southwest, summer days are just about unbearable out on the water. The sun beats down mercilessly, with temperatures going well above 110 on most days. Add to that hordes of tipsy water skiers and jet skiers and you have a recipe for a lousy day on the lake. That’s why most tournaments out here during the summer are night tournaments. It’s still hot, but at least the sun isn’t pounding you and crisping your skin. Even better, the night bite can be awesome - especially when the moon is out - and nothing gets bigger bites at night in my neck of the woods than a chubby little Hula Grub on a football head jig.